Scientific Studies on Thieves Oil
Harvard and John Hopkins Universities have done studies, the conclusions:
50% of buildings, old and new, have mold.
Resulting in a 50-100% increase in respiratory problems.
The Mayo Clinic says –
1 in 7 Americans suffers from acute fungal sinustis,
resulting from exposure to mold.
For thousands of years of research and recorded medical use clearly prove that most viruses, fungi,
and bacteria do not live in the presence of oils high in phenols, carcacrol, thymol, and terpenes.  
Lemon, rosemary and eucalyptus oils contain d-limonene, cinede, beta-myrcene, alpha-pinene,
beta-pinene and camphor. Cinnamaldehyde is a major component in it's essential
cinnamon oil.
Eugenol is found in both it's
clove and cinnamon oils.

Effect of a Diffused Essential Oil Blend on Bacterial Bioaerosols
Author: S. C. Chao, D. G. Young, and C. J. Oberg
Journal: Journal of Essential Oil Research 10, 517523 (Sept/Oct 1998)
Location: Weber State University, Ogden, UT
Abstract: A proprietary blend of oils containing cinnamon, rosemary, clove, eucalyptus, and lemon was tested for its antibacterial activity against airborne
Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus.
The bacteria cultures were sprayed in an enclosed area, and Thieves was diffused for a given amount of time. There was an 82% reduction in M. luteus
bioaerosol, a
96% reduction in the P. aeruginosa bioaerosol, and a 44% reduction in the S. aureus bioaerosol following 10 minutes of exposure.
Conclusion: Diffusion of the oil blend, Thieves, significantly reduces the number of aerosol-borne bacteria.
Essential Oil of Lemon
According to Jean Valnet, MD, the vaporized essence of lemon can kill meningococcus bacteria in 15 minutes, typhoid bacilli in one hour, Staphylococcus
aureus in two hours, and Pneumococcus bacteria within three hours. Even a 0.2% solution of lemon oil can kill diphtheria bacteria in 20 minutes and
inactivate tuberculosis. Essential Oils Desk Reference, 3rd Ed, p63
The proprietary therapeutic-grade essential oil blend in Thieves consists of: Cinnamon, Clove, Eucalyptus, Lemon and Rosemary.
Science on the effects of Therapeutic-grade Essential Oils in Thieves:
Clove
Effective Against: bacteriaActinomyces viscosus
Compounds from Syzygium aromaticum inhibit growth of oral pathogens Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia.
Cinnamon
Effective Against:fungi
Aspergillus flavus
Aspergillus fumigatus
Aspergillus nidulans
Aspergillus niger
Aspergillus parasiticus
Vapors of cinnamon bark oil prove to be a potent fungitoxicant against fungi which cause respiratory tract mycoses: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus,
Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus flavus, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis, and Histoplasma capsulatum.
Cinnamon bark oil, a potent fungitoxicant against fungi causing respiratory tract mycoses.
Singh HB, Srivastava M, Singh AB, Srivastava AK.
Centre for Biochemical Technology, Delhi, India.
Abstract Summary:
1: Allergy. 1995 Dec;50(12):995-9.
Cinnamic aldehyde has been identified as the active fungitoxic constituent of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil. The fungitoxic properties of the
vapours of the oil/active constituent against fungi involved in respiratory tract mycoses, i.e., Aspergillus niger, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans A. flavus, Candida
albicans, C. tropicalis, C. pseudotropicalis, and Histoplasma capsulatum, were determined in vitro as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum lethal
concentration (MLC), inoculum density sustained, and exposure duration for fungicidal action at MIC and higher doses, as well as effect of incubation
temperatures on fungitoxicity. It is concluded that these inhalable vapours appear to approach the ideal chemotherapy for respiratory tract mycoses.
Publication Types: Comparative Study PMID: 8834832 [PubMed.gov - indexed for MEDLINE]
Cinnamon oil caused inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus.
Abstract Summary:
1: J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1994;13(1):67–72
Inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus by essential oils of selected plant materials.
Tantaoui-Elaraki A, Beraoud L. Department of Food Microbiology and Biotechnology, Hassan II Institute for Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Rabat-
Instituts, Morocco.
We studied the effect of 13 chemically different essential oils (EO) on the mycelial growth of and aflatoxin synthesis by Aspergillus parasiticus. Cinnamon,
thyme, oregano, and cumin EO were able to stop mycelial growth at only 0.1% in the medium, while curcumin, ginger, lemon, and orange EO were unable to
inhibit totally the growth even at 1% concentration. Coriander, black pepper, mugwort, bay, and rosemary EO caused the growth to stop at concentrations
between 0.2 and 1%. The EO most active upon mycelial growth were also the most active against aflatoxinogenesis. However, aflatoxin synthesis was
inhibited by all the EO at higher extent than the mycelial growth.
Publication Types: Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t PMID: 7823297
[PubMed.gov - indexed for MEDLINE]
Cinnamon essential oil caused inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus.
Candida albicans
Candida tropicalis
Candida kefyr
Vapors of cinnamon bark essential oil prove to be a potent fungitoxicant against fungi which cause respiratory tract mycoses: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus
fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus flavus, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis (Candida kefyr), and Histoplasma
capsulatum.

Abstract Summary:
Allergy. 1995 Dec;50(12):995-9. Related Articles, Links
Cinnamon bark oil, a potent fungitoxicant against fungi causing respiratory tract mycoses. Singh HB, Srivastava M, Singh AB, Srivastava AK. Centre for
Biochemical Technology, Delhi, India.
Cinnamic aldehyde has been identified as the active fungitoxic constituent of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil. The fungitoxic properties of the
vapours of the oil/active constituent against fungi involved in respiratory tract mycoses, i.e., Aspergillus niger, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans A. flavus, Candida
albicans, C. tropicalis, C. pseudotropicalis, and Histoplasma capsulatum, were determined in vitro as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum lethal
concentration (MLC), inoculum density sustained, and exposure duration for fungicidal action at MIC and higher doses, as well as effect of incubation
temperatures on fungitoxicity. It is concluded that these
inhalable vapours appear to approach the ideal chemotherapy for respiratory tract mycoses.
So there you have it!
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